What is your favorite genre to read?

Monday, May 31, 2010

Believing Christ


Believing Christ by Stephen E. Robinson

(Summary taken from the book jacket) "In Believing Christ, Stephen E. Robinson eloquently discusses the marvelous news of the gospel: what Jesus Christ has done for us. Using examples from people's lives and modern-day analogies and parables to illustrate scriptural principles, he explains the doctrines of atonement, grace, justification, salvation, and perfection so clearly and understandably one need never be confused by them again. 'The good news of the gospel is good news to me not because it promises that other people who are better than I am can be saved, but because it promises that I can be saved--wretched, inadequate, and imperfect me. And until I accept that possibility, ...I have not really accepted the good news of the gospel.'"



I remember when this book came out and everyone read it and said how good it was....except for me. For some reason I never read it, and I wish I had. This book is amazing! My whole life I have felt guilty about not being able to do everything in the gospel perfectly all the time (let's just say...family history). After reading this I felt a huge weight lifted off my shoulders. I now know that it is okay if I'm not perfect at family history right now as long as I am doing my best. As long as I try my hardest and do my best, and continually stretch myself just a little, then I know I will be okay. Wow. What a relief. I might go so far as to say this book is "life changing." He puts it in so many ways that if you don't understand it at first, by the end you will because there is an example that would relate to everyone. I wish I had read it years ago!

Rating: PG (It's a little deep for younger readers, but I would still let them read it.)

Recommendation: 12 and up. And yes, I would have everyone read it! I loved this book!

Sunday, May 23, 2010

America's Prophet


America's Prophet by Bruce Feiler

(Summary taken from the book jacket) "The pilgrims quoted his story. Franklin and Jefferson proposed he appear on the U.S. seal. Washington and Lincoln were called his incarnations. The Statue of Liberty and Superman were molded in his image. Martin Luther King, Jr., invoked him the night before he died. Ronald Reagan and Barack Obama cited him as inspiration. For four hundred years, one figure inspired more Americans than any other. His name is Moses. In this groundbreaking book, New York Times best-selling author Bruce Feiler travels through touchstones in American history and traces the biblical prophet's influence from the Mayflower through today. He visits the island where the pilgrims spent their first Sabbath, climbs the bell tower where the Liberty Bell was inscribed with a quote from Moses, retraces the Underground Railroad where "Go Down, Moses" was the national anthem of slaves, and dons the robe Charlton Heston wore in The Ten Commandments. One part adventure story, one part literary detective story, one part exploration of faith in contemporary life, America's Prophet takes readers through the landmarks of America's narrative--from Gettysburg to Selma, the Silver Screen to the Oval Office--to understand how Moses has shaped the nation's character."

I really enjoyed this book. It reads easily, yet is very informative. He uses a lot of great vocabulary words, some that I had to look up. Feiler brings up things I had no idea happened in America's past, and I loved it. I love American history, so this book was great for me. I also love the Moses story, so it fit in perfectly with my train of thought. I loved all the little-known details he puts in the book. He did a lot of research and it all comes together very smoothly. I didn't realize how much our country was influenced by Moses and his story, and I found it interesting and intriguing. Anyway, I would definitely recommend this book. You don't have to be a believer in Moses to enjoy it because it discusses America's history, and whether you believe or not, our history was influenced by Moses.

Rating: PG

Recommendation: This would be great for any history class to reference. I think high school students and up would gain a greater understanding of our country's heritage by reading this book. It is lighter than a text book but is still history. His style of writing is very engaging.

Wednesday, May 19, 2010

Shattered Silence



Shattered Silence by Melissa G. Moore

(Summary taken from the back cover) "What would you do if, as a teenager, you found out that someone you loved had committed the most horrific of acts? Worse, what if he had done it again and again? Could you ever learn to forgive him? Would you ever want to? In Shattered Silence, Melissa Moore shares the true story of her life as the daughter of the notorious "Happy Face" serial killer. In this inspiring story, Melissa grows from a confused child to an outraged adolescent to an accepting adult. As she slowly connects the dots and realizes the full extent of the terrifying and gruesome crimes her father has committed, Melissa also begins to realize that she cannot change her father--all she has control over is her own life and deciding how she will react to everything that has happened. Told with heartbreaking sincerity, this uplifting story of optimism and discovering joy, even in the face of overwhelming adversity, will inspire you to face your own challenges with a similar attitude of hope."

Wow. What a story. This woman is amazing. I know people who have had bad things happen to them and they fall apart and decide not to find joy in anything, which is understandable. This woman, Melissa, does not let that happen. She realizes that we are what we make of ourselves, and it is a choice to find joy and happiness. Oh, to have a dad that commits murder, that could destroy you and your future. Her courage to overcome that is heroic. I was skeptical about this book. I didn't see how it could be uplifting, but it is.  It is well written and surprisingly inspiring. It makes you realize that the problems you have may be hard but are nothing compared to what others deal with. I would definitely recommend this book. There are some parts that are hard to read because of the content, but it is worth finishing.

Rating: PG-13 (She talks about the horrific crimes her father commits, her rape, and domestic violence.) Borderline R.

Recommendation: High School Senior and up. It also depends on the level of maturity of a high school senior. It may be too much for them also. I do recommend reading it though because it puts things in perspective and shows you how you can choose to live your life and not be a victim for the rest of your life.

Sunday, May 2, 2010

Catching Fire (Hunger Games #2)


Catching Fire (Hunger Games #2) by Suzanne Collins

(Summary taken from the book jacket) "Against all odds, Katniss has won the Hunger Games. She and fellow District 12 tribute Peeta Mellark are miraculously still alive. Katniss should be relieved, happy even. After all, she has returned to her family and her longtime friend, Gale. Yet nothing is the way Katniss wishes it to be. Gale holds her at an icy distance. Peeta has turned his back on her completely. And there are whispers of a rebellion against the Capitol--a rebellion that Katniss and Peeta may have helped create. Much to her shock, Katniss has fueled an unrest she's afraid she cannot stop. And what scares her even more is that she's not entirely convinced she should try. As time draws near for Katniss and Peeta to visit the districts on the Capitol's cruel Victory Tour, the stakes are higher than ever. If they can't prove, without a shadow of a doubt, that they are lost in their love for each other, the consequences will be horrifying."

Wow. That's all I have to say....wow. This book is VERY intense! It doesn't start out as intense, but at the end....wow. The last fifty pages go so fast and there is so much happening I had to reread a couple of paragraphs because I wasn't sure who was doing what, and there was action everywhere. And the ending.....may I say, "What ending?????" She leaves you hanging on for dear life at the end. I hate it when the book doesn't end...I kept turning the empty pages at the end begging for more. There are so many twists and turns it's crazy. And I have to wait until WHEN for the next book??? AAAAHHHHHH! It's going to be a long couple of months. But I digress....I have to give it to Ms. Collins, she did a very good job on this second book. The characters are much more developed and it is very well written. I felt a lot more as if I were there with the people of District 12, as if I were afraid of the Capitol myself, and as if I too had emotions running wild. Once again, how can you love a book full of death and destruction?? I don't know, but Ms. Collins' writing just pulls you in and keeps you there. If you were depressed after the first book I would say definitely read the second one. It is still depressing, but the intensity of it overrides the depressing factor. You still have no idea between Gale and Peeta, and NOTHING is finalized, in fact, on the last page there are more questions that haven't been answered than have, but it is worth reading because there might be a smidgeon of hope??? You'll have to decide for yourself on that one.

Rating: R (Remember, this rating does not follow the movie ratings. An R rating simply means there are adult themes that I don't think are appropriate for younger children.)  There is little to no language. Peeta and Katniss kiss and sleep in the same bed for comfort, but nothing inappropriate happens. It is the violence and death that make this book inappropriate for young readers. The themes are very mature and would be hard for a younger reader to understand and deal with.

Recommendation: Senior year of high school and up. Also, I would only recommend it to adults with the above precautions. As with the first book, death and despair are abundant......but I liked it??? Hmmm. Hopefully the third book brings some happiness!