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Friday, October 8, 2010

Across a Harvested Field

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Across a Harvested Field by Robert Goble

(Summary taken from the back of the book) "To Jordan Fairchild, the dark-haired girl renting his basement apartment seems somewhat quiet and reclusive. Just a business arrangement, he thinks, as he watches her sign the name "Nattie Hand" on the contract. Though two thousand miles away, Celeste Betancourt, an attractive Georgetown graduate student he met through a mutual friend, has captured his attention. A budding friendship with Nattie soon begins to bloom. Little does Jordan know his girl-next-door renter is none other than the world-famous pop star, a.k.a. Natalia Antonali, who recently disappeared from the public eye; little does he know how much his friendship will mean to her, how, for the first time, a love begins to grow, untainted by 'Natalia,' and how she hopes Jordan never discovers the truth."

I need to begin by saying that this author, Mr. Goble, found me on Facebook and sent me this book to review. I thank him for the opportunity and hope that he still "Like"(s) my blog after reading my review.  Although I am a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS or Mormon are other sometimes used names), LDS fiction has never been my favorite genre. Unfortunately for Mr. Goble, this book did not change my opinion of LDS fiction. One look at the cover and I knew I was in trouble. I would never have picked this book off the shelf. Having said that, I did read it. I liked the characters in the book, but the whole scenario just seemed too impossible. How would a superstar (comparable to Brittney Spears) end up in Magna, UT? It never explained why she chose to go there or how she even knew where it was. I thought Jordan was a nice guy, but the pieces didn't really fit together for me. I felt bad that he had lost his family at such a young age, and I could have empathy for him, but I just could not see a widowed man in his mid-to-late twenties canning pumpkins, peaches, and pears. My husband does help me when I can fruit, but he would NEVER do it if I weren't around. That just never felt right to me, but maybe other men would do it. And then the thought that "Nattie" and "Natalia" might be the same person never crossed his mind as he saw her on the news and in magazines, never? I don't know.

Mr. Goble's writing style is different. He uses a lot of parenthesis to explain little side-notes that add to the "cheesy" feeling in the book. I was also confused....was it LDS fiction or not? Let me explain: you would expect an LDS fiction book to have references to LDS buildings, church meetings, and standards (not smoking or drinking alcohol, or using profanity), but you would also expect the characters to follow those standards. There was a lot of profanity in this book. Not all the worst words, but a lot of little four-letter words. It drove me crazy. His writing feels forced. He tries in a few instances to have Jordan sound intellectual, but it comes across as someone trying to sound intellectual, not as someone who is actually intellectual.  I think Mr. Goble would have made the whole thing feel better if he had taken all the LDS references out and just made it a fictional love story. To all LDS fiction writers everywhere--that is what readers want, just good, clean reads. We are LDS and we consider ourselves normal, everyday people, not a group that needs special books written just for us. Besides, you will get a lot more readers if everyone can read it and not just one group.

Anyway, this happens to be one of my "soap-box" topics, so please forgive me for going on. Overall, the middle of the book was the best. It actually had me turning pages to see what happened with the paparazzi and with Jordan finding out the truth. Except that I hated how Jordan went into this mad rage and ruined everything in a split second. His rage was over-the-top. The ending was okay but unbelievable. I didn't hate the book, but I would not recommend it to my friends because I know they feel the same way I do about LDS fiction. If you like the genre and are okay with profanity then I would recommend it.

Rating: PG-13 (Profanity, some kissing and some innuendos)

Recommendation: High school and up. I would recommend it if you enjoy LDS fiction and are okay with profanity.

2 comments:

Audrey Reynolds said...

Mr. Goble never does say that this book was supposed to be classified as "LDS Fiction" nor did he mean it for an exclusive LDS readership. It is a book in a Utah setting with some characters who happen to be LDS. He writes for a broader audience and if you are under the impression it is a usual LDS romance when you pick it up you are going to be disappointed as Monica was. In no way is this "PG-13". maybe an iffy "PG" for some honest emotions from a male point of view, a sort of passionate kiss, and a couple of mild swear words which I can't truly classify "profanity".
This book is classified by the publisher as "adult fiction" and was never geared to juvenals. That said, some people liked it enough to award it the Marilyn Brown Novel Award. I found this book well-written, entertaining, and refreshingly different in a sea of milquetoast, poorly written LDS novels.
--Audrey Reynolds, Rexburg,ID

Monica said...

Thank you for your comment, I appreciate all feedback and opinions.